Memories of Alonnisos - Photo Gallery

GETTING TO ALONNISOS

FROM ATHENS BY ROAD & SEA

There is a coach connecting central of Athens to the port of Agios Konstantinos, about 160 Km to the north. The coach leaves Kanningos square, near Omonia Square, approximately 3 - 3,5 hrs prior to the ferry or hydrofoil departure time from Ag. Konstantinos. Tickets can be purchased from Alkyon Travel, 97 Akadimias street (adjacent to the coach departure point).

Seats on the coach should be reserved at the same time as booking ferry or hydrofoil tickets. The coach stops at a cafe mid-way through the journey, and terminates on the harbor front at Ag. Konstantinos. The ferry to Alonnisos takes approximately 4 hours and 20 minutes while the hydrofoil takes 2 hours and 45 minutes.

To see up-to-date timetable information, click on the 'Coastal Tickets' button at the left of the screen, enter 'Ag. Konstantinos' under 'From', 'Alonnisos' under 'To', and the date you wish to travel. (back to map)

FROM ATHENS BY AIR

Olympic Airlines fly from Athens airport (El. Venizelos) to Skiathos throughout the year. During the winter there is a twice-weekly service, while during the summer there is a daily service. Tthe flight time is 40 minutes and the one way ticket costs around 45 €. From Skiathos there are frequent ferry and hydrofoil connentions to Alonnisos. To see up-to-date timetable information, click on the 'Coastal Tickets' button at the left of the screen, enter 'Skiathos' under 'From', 'Alonnisos' under 'To', and the date you wish to travel. (back to map)
 

FROM VOLOS

Hydrofoils (a fast way of travelling for foot passengers only) leave Volos for Alonnisos daily, stopping at Skiathos and Skopelos en route. These are more frequent during the summer. The journey time is 2 hours and 30 minutes. There is also a ferry service for foot passengers and vehicles which takes 4 hours and 15 minutes. To see up-to-date timetable information, click on the 'Coastal Tickets' button at the left of the screen, enter 'Volos' under 'From', 'Alonnisos' under 'To', and the date you wish to travel. (back to map)
 

FROM THESSALONIKI

There is a daily Flying Cat service for foot passengers which makes the journey in just 3 hours. In addition, a ferry service for foot passengers and vehicles takes 5 hours 40 minutes to reach Alonnisos. To see up-to-date timetable information, click on the 'Coastal Tickets' button at the left of the screen, enter 'Thessaloniki' under 'From', 'Alonnisos' under 'To', and the date you wish to travel. (back to map)
 

FROM ITALY

There are ferry boats from Bari, Ancona, Brindisi and Venice to Igoumenitsa and Patras. If your destination on the east coast of Greece is Volos, it would be better to alight the ferry at Igoumenitsa. this is 362 Kms from Volos, a drive of about 5 hours. If you wish to get to Agios Konstantinos, alight the ferry from Patras. From Patras there are the new cable bridge (Rio to Antirio) and a small ferry boat which crosses the Corinthian gulf between the above ports. From here it is almost 200 Kms to Agios Konstantinos, a drive of about 4 hours. (back to map)
 

FROM WESTERN EUROPE

There are charter flights to Skiathos from various airports in Holland, the United Kingdom, Italy and Germany. From Skiathos there are frequent hydrofoil / ferry crossings to Alonnisos. (back to map)
 

About ALONNISOS

The island of Alonnisos is thirteen miles long and three miles wide, and like her eighbors Skopelos and Skiathos, her hillsides are covered in thick pine forests and olive groves. Close by are the tiny islands of Peristera, home to a few shepherds and small colonies of cormorants; Panagia Kyra, uninhabited except for wild goats; Skangoura and her isolated monastery; Pappou, uninhabited except for wild hares; Youra, again uninhabited except for wild goats and possessing a spectacular cave which is believed to have been the home of the Cyclops Life on Skopelos is led at a slow pace.

The pace on Alonnisos is slower. Traditional professions and customs are evident; out of the island's population of nearly 2000, 200 are fishermen. The fishing port of Patitiri is a colorful jostle of large and small caiques supplying the island and the mainland with a rich assortment of fish. Shaded by trees, the waterfront bars and taverns of Patitiri provide an attractive setting for those who like to watch the complicated antics of yachtsmen negotiating mooring space with local fishing boats. Two supermarkets, three bakeries, two fruit shops and an innovative 'croissanterie' provide for all tastes.

Goat tracks through the forested interior of the island provide the means to explore the wild and uninhabited terrain - areas left to the olive and plum pickers and circling hawks and falcons.

Taking a private boat from Patitiri and traveling along the south-eastern coastline, one passes the small fishing village of Votsi; secluded coves backed by wooded hillsides; the sheltered harbor of Steni Vala with its sleepy, waterfront taverns specializing in rich soups of scorpion fish aČnd mullet; the neighboring island of Peristera, carpeted with wild olive trees and indented by small sandy bays; the seaside hamlet of Kalamakia, consisting of three family homes each with their own tavern above a jetty; a further stretch of secluded beaches culminating in a cluster of deep sea caves studded by stalactites.

Alonnisos is an island of contrasts: a rich green interior of pine forest and olive grove, the varied shades of blue Aegean Sea; small, secluded beaches and deep sea-caves carved out of steep cliff faces; the port of Patitiri, busy with its fleet of fishing boats and visiting yachts, and the unhurried atmosphere of the old town.
 

ALONNISOS OLD TOWN

The old town of Alonnisos is set back on a hilltop behind Patitiri, a walk of about forty minutes. To one side of the town' s entrance are four circular, stone 'threshing-floors' which were once used to separate wheat grain. The highest point of the town holds a series of small squares with cafe bars and taverns, shaded by mulberry and cypress trees, which command spectacular views out to sea.

Cobblestone pathways descend the hillside past clusters of terraced houses, some neglected and overgrown, others carefully restored and adorned with bright bougainvillea. The town is quiet and sleepy but with more houses available for holiday lets it is slowly becoming busier; there are only three general stores and a few boutiques that appear incongruous in such a secluded setting.